Institute for Research in African-American Studies (IRAAS) E- List notice – April 2015

Having trouble viewing this email? Click here

Events & Notices
Spring 2015

Envision, Engage, Transform... “Envisioning the academy as a site of critical engagement for social transformation..” IRAAS is an intellectual community that bridges scholarship, teaching and public life.

Faculty Participant Event
Please come and join in for
“The Conversation – Young Women, Empowerment, & Leadership” on Tuesday, March 31, at 7:15 PM in the Milbank Chapel of Teachers College, Columbia University. 
It will be featuring a stellar panel including:
Dr Michelle Knight-Manuel, Ph.D. – Associate Professor of Education at Teachers College, Columbia University
Professor Kathryn Kolbert, J.D. – Constance Hess Williams Director of the Athena Center For Leadership Studies at Barnard College, Columbia University
Professor Dorothy Roberts, J.D.  – George A. Weiss University Professor of Law and Sociology and The Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights At the University of Pennsylvania Law School
Dr. Farah Griffin, Ph.D. – William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African-American Studies at Columbia University
Dr. Debra Minkoff, Ph.D. – Professor and Chair of Sociology at Barnard College, Columbia University
For all inquiries please email: TheConversationTC@gmail.com
Follow us on —
Twitter: @ConversationTc
Instagram @TheConversationTC
___________________________________________________________________
The Conversation” is a panel series in a talk show format that strives to educate and initiate conversations with people on topics and issues that mainstream media sometimes overlooks. Previous panel discussions featured topics such as School to Prison Pipeline, Homophobia in Youth Culture, Undocumented Youth in the U.S., and the State of African American Males in Urban Education with Brennan DuBose, PhD student, creator and host of the series.”

Scholar in Residence Public Lecture
“ANCHORING AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE”
with
GINA DENT
Associate Professor of Feminist Studies-University of California, Santa Cruz
Wednesday, April 1, 2015 at 6:00pm
Columbia University Faculty House
64 Morningside Drive at 116th Street
 (between Amsterdam Avenue & Morningside Drive)
Free & Open to the Public

presented in co-sponsorship with
SPEAKER BIO
Gina Dent
  (Ph.D., English & Comparative Literature, Columbia University) is Associate Professor of Feminist Studies, History of Consciousness, and Legal Studies at University of California, Santa Cruz.  She served previously as Director of the Institute for Advanced Feminist Research and as Principal Investigator for the UC Multicampus Research Group on Transnationalizing Justice.  She is the editor of Black Popular Culture ([1993] New York: The New Press, 1998) and author of articles on race, feminism, popular culture, and visual art. Her forthcoming book Anchored to the Real: Black Literature in the Wake of Anthropology (Duke University Press) is a study of the consequences-both disabling and productive-of social science’s role in translating black writers into American literature.  Her current project grows out of her work as an advocate for human rights and prison abolition-Prison as a Border and Other Essays, on popular culture and the conditions of knowledge.  She has offered courses in critical race studies and black feminisms in Brazil (Universidade Federal da Bahia), Colombia (Universidad Nacional de Colombia), and Sweden (Linköping University) and lectures widely on these and other subjects. In June 2011, she was a member of a delegation of indigenous and women of color feminists to Palestine and speaks often from that experience.

Directions to Faculty House

http://facultyhouse.columbia.edu/files/facultyhouse/web/Faculty_House_Directions_0.pdf

Cosponsored Event
Caribbean Queer Visualities Symposium -Columbia University 
***seating is limited***
Thursday, 2 April 2015 – Room 754 Schermerhorn Extension

5:00pm          Opening        David Scott
5:15pm          Session I       Richard Fung and Terri Francis
6:15pm          Reception
Friday, 3 April 2015 – Room 963 Schermerhorn Extension

9:45am          Introduction   Nijah Cunningham
10:00am        Session II      Nadia Huggins and Angelique V. Nixon
11:00am        Session III     Jorge Pineda and Maja Horn
12:00pm        Lunch
2:00pm          Session IV    Charl Landvreugd and Rosamund S. King
3:00pm          Session V     Jean-Ulrick Désert and Jerry Philogene
4:30pm         Closing remarks  Kellie Jones, Associate Professor, Columbia University
Sponsored by
Department of Anthropology, Columbia University * Institute for Research in African-American Studies (IRAAS), Columbia University * Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality (IRWGS), Columbia University * The Digital Black Atlantic Project (DBAP), Columbia University * Small Axe * The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts
Questions please email : DAS133@COLUMBIA.EDU OR NNC 2109@COLUMBIA.EDU

Affiliated Event

The Center for Ethnomusicology invites you to the second screening of our   
Ethnographic Film Series:

 

Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975
701C Dodge Hall
Thursday, April 2, at 8:00pm

 

Refreshments will be served.Free and Open to the Public!

Affiliate Center Event
The 20th Century American Politics and Society Workshop, co-hosted with the Center on African-American Politics, will be holding its next meeting on Thursday, April 2.
Richard Brooks (Columbia Law School) will join the workshop to present “Saving the Neighborhood: Race, Covenants and Segregation in the Twentieth Century.”
The discussants will be Kimberly Johnson (Political Science, Barnard) and Rajiv Sethi (Economics, Barnard).
The reading material is available on the event’s web page:
As usual, the workshop will be held at 4:10 p.m. Please note this year the workshop will be meeting in the Lehman Center, Room 406 IAB, 420 West 118th Street, New York, NY 10027.
Questions please email smk2175@columbia.edu

Cosponsored Event

Please visit the  event page for RSVP to each of the events

RSVP necessary
OFFICE OF COMMUNITY OUTREACH AND EDUCATION | CONVERSATION
Russell Banks and Caryl Phillips 
In Conversation: Giovanni’s Room
Tues, Apr 7, 7 pm
The James Room, Barnard College
418 Barnard Hall
]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]

RSVP Necessary
http://arts.columbia.edu/coe/events/2015/yojb/notes-of-a-native-son

OFFICE OF COMMUNITY OUTREACH AND EDUCATION | CONVERSATION
Phillip Lopate and Kiese Laymon
In Conversation: Notes of a Native Son
Thurs, Apr 23, 6:30 pm
Milbank Chapel, Teachers College, Columbia University
125 Zankel Building
525 West 120th Street (between Broadway and Amsterdam)

]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]

RSVP Necessary
OFFICE OF COMMUNITY OUTREACH AND EDUCATION | CONVERSATION
Joe Morton and Margo Jefferson
In Conversation: The Devil Finds Work
Thurs, Apr 30, 7:30 pm
417 Altschul Auditorium, Columbia University
420 West 118th Street between Amsterdam and Morningside Avenues

Join Our Mailing List!

Follow us on TwitterLike us on Facebook

Contact Information
Columbia University
Institute for Research in African-American Studies

1200 Amsterdam Avenue, 758 Schermerhorn Ext – MC5512
New York, NY 10027

Institute for Research in African-American Studies | 1200 Amsterdam Avenue | 758 Schermerhorn Ext |MC 5512 | New York | NY | 10027
Advertisements

IRAAS Alumna Marti Newland, PhD on 4/22/15 “CONCERT SPIRITUALS AND THE BLACK SOPRANO” RECITAL AND PANEL DISCUSSION

RECITAL AND PANEL DISCUSSION: “CONCERT SPIRITUALS AND THE BLACK SOPRANO”

Event Date:
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 – 7:00pm9:00pm
Location:
Columbia University St. Paul’s Chapel: 1160 Amsterdam Avenue – New York, NY

PARTICIPANTS INCLUDE:

Source: Institute for Research in African American Studies at Columbia University

IRAAS Conversations Lecture – “Feeling Arab and Black: Conversations about Race and Disability in Literature”

IRAAS Conversations Lecture 

Thursday March 26th, 2015 6:15pm -8:15pm

Columbia School of Social Work – Room C03

“Feeling Arab and Black: Conversations about Race and Disability in Literature”

with  

Theri Pickens, Assistant Professor of English – Bates College

 In her first book, New Body Politics: Narrating Arab and Black Identity in the Contemporary United States, Therí Pickens begins with following premise: In the increasingly multi-racial and multi-ethnic American landscape of the present, understanding and bridging dynamic cross-cultural conversations about social and political concerns becomes a complicated humanistic project. What can the experience of corporeality offer social and political discourse? And, how does that discourse change when those bodies belong to Arab Americans and African Americans? By way of answer, she argues that Arab American and African American narratives rely on the body’s fragility, rather than its exceptional strength or emotion, to create urgent social and political critiques.

Suturing critical race studies, and disability studies, Pickens turns to Du Bois’s question “how does it feel to be a problem?” since it hovers over her book project. She zeroes in on the verb “to feel,” accepting the invitation for phenomenological inquiry. In this talk, she examines Du Bois’s question as a framework that opens up new possibilities in analyzing Arab American author Rabih Alameddine. Alameddine’s fiction not only lingers on what it means to ‘feel’ like a problem but also proffers the space of the hospital as a way to orient a critique. Side-stepping the erasure of “Arab as the new Black,” Pickens proffers the conversation between Du Bois and Alameddine as a way to answer the exigencies of feeling, and being now.

Speaker Bio
Her research focuses on Arab American and African American literatures and cultures, Disability Studies, philosophy, and literary theory. She authored New Body Politics: Narrating Arab and Black Identity in the Contemporary United States, which asks: How does a story about embodied experience transform from mere anecdote to social and political critique?

Her critical work has appeared in MELUS, Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, Women & Performance, Polymath: An Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences Journal, Disability Studies Quarterly, Al-Jadid, Journal of Canadian Literature, Al-Raida, the ground-breaking collection, Blackness and Disability: Critical Examinations and Cultural Interventions, and the critical volume, Defying the Global Language: Perspectives in Ethnic Studies (Teneo Ltd). She also has more upcoming critical work in the journal, Hypatia.

She is also a creative writer. Her poetry has appeared in Black Renaissance/Renaissance Noire, Save the Date, and Disability Studies Quarterly. Her drama has been performed at the NJ State Theater.

Join Our Mailing List!

Follow us on TwitterLike us on Facebook

Contact Information
Columbia University

Institute for Research in African-American Studies

1200 Amsterdam Avenue, 758 Schermerhorn Ext – MC5512

New York, NY 10027

Deborah Willis, Ph.D.”Re-imagining Gender, Place and Race in the Making of Gone with the Wind” Zora Neale Hurston Lecture

 

Monday March 23rd , 2015

6:00pm- 8:00pm

Columbia University School of Journalism  

3rd Floor Lecture Hall – 2950 Broadway

“Re-imagining Gender, Place and Race in the Making of Gone with the Wind”
University Professor and Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging
at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University

2015 marks the 75th anniversary of the making of the film Gone With the Wind. New York University professor, Deborah Willis will consider a comparative perspective of the historic film and the role photography and art played in re-membering and restaging events from the Civil War and American Slavery before and after Emancipation. Taking cues from the recent 150th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation

, this talk also examines the public’s memory of Slavery through photographs and how images influenced the making of the film. Professor Willis will present overlapping historical narratives from popular culture to literary text making visible the complexities of the film.

This lecture will weave a narrative on the history of American photography during its early years with iconic moments in the film looking closely at the role black American history played in making this film both controversial and celebratory. Willis will include Civil War images and 20th century video clips of scenes from the film, clips of Hattie McDaniel and Carol Burnett’s skit, Went with the Wind.

New York University professor Deborah Willis will weave together a narrative of the early years of American photography and film with a reading of iconic moments in Gone With the Wind. In rendering visible the complexities of the film, Professor Willis will also examine the role history played in producing such a controversial and celebrated cultural phenomenon.

 FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC  

Live stream online

Join Our Mailing List!

Follow us on TwitterLike us on Facebook

Contact Information
Columbia University

Institute for Research in African-American Studies

1200 Amsterdam Avenue, 758 Schermerhorn Ext – MC5512

New York, NY 10027

Two-week Summer Teacher’s and Scholar’s Institute (STSI) Application Due April 15, 2015

Two-week Summer Teacher’s and Scholar’s Institute (STSI) Application Due April 15, 2015
 
GENERAL INFORMATION
Between 13 and 24 July, 2015, the Columbia University Institute for Research in African-American Studies (#IRAAS) will convene a two-week Summer Teacher’s and Scholar’s Institute (STSI), focusing particularly on the history, cultures, and institutions of African-descended peoples in New York City. New York, home to Harlem and numerous other historic black enclaves, historically and today is one of the capitals of Black America, and even the Black World.
This Summer Institute offers what few others are able: the opportunity to study African-American history, culture, politics, and life through the lens of New York, and in New York.
The Summer Teacher’s and Scholar’s Institute (STSI) will be open to high school and college/university instructors, independent scholars and researchers, public historians, biographers, journalists, and graduate students, and will explore various historical and contemporary themes, including: Slavery, Freedom, Abolitionism, and Emancipation; the New Negro Movement and the Harlem Renaissance; Educating Harlem (and Beyond): Histories of Black Education in New York City; Civil Rights, 1940-the present; Black Women Intellectuals; “Beyond Harlem: Brooklyn and the Bronx”; Race, Policing and Criminal Justice, 1880-present; Black Immigration since 1965; Health/Medical Rights and Politics: From Tuberculosis to HIV; and Black Politics from the Margins to Mainstream.
ELIGIBILITY
The Summer Teacher’s and Scholar’s Institute (STSI) will be open to high school and college/university instructors, independent scholars and researchers, public historians, biographers, journalists, and graduate students.
Source: http://stsi.iraas.columbia.edu

IRAAS Conversations Lecture – Thursday 3/5/15 at 6:00PM Prof Cheryl D. Hick

TOPIC: “Talk With You Like A Woman: African American Women, Justice and Reform in New York,1890-1935” with Prof. Cheryl D. Hick

Location :Columbia Journalism School -3rd Floor Lecture Hall;
2950 Broadway, New York, NY 10027
Free & Open to the Public

Cheryl D. Hicks is an associate Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte where she is a faculty affiliate in Africana Studies and an adjunct faculty member in Women and Gender Studies. She holds a B.A. in American History from the University of Virginia and a M.A. as well as Ph.D. in American History from Princeton University.

Her research addresses the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, and the law. She has published in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review and the Journal of the History of Sexuality. She is the recipient of several awards including the University of Virginia’s Carter G. Woodson Postdoctoral fellowship and a Scholar-in-Residence fellowship from the New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

Her first book, Talk With You Like a Woman: African American Women, Justice, and Reform in New York, 1890-1935 (University of North Carolina Press, 2010) received the 2011 Letitia Woods Brown Book Award from the Association of Black Women Historians and honorable mentions from the 2011 John Hope Franklin Prize from the American Studies Association and the 2011 Darlene Clark Hine Prize from the Organization of American Historians. Her new book project, “The Case of Hannah Elias: Interracial Intimacy and Civil Rights in Turn-of-the-Century New York,” interrogates the trajectory of a covert, consensual interracial relationship that ultimately precipitated murder, scandal, and civil rights protest.

http://iraas.com