11/17/17 Conversations Yvette Christianse, PhD – Reading The Register of Liberated Africans in the Seychelles

CONVERSATIONS WITH YVETTE CHRISTIANSE

DATE & TIME:
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2017

4:00PM TO 6:00PM

TOPIC: READING THE REGISTER OF LIBERATED AFRICANS IN THE SEYCHELLES
YVETTE CHRISTIANSË
Chair, Africana Studies Department; Professor, Africana Studies & English and Comparative Literature, Barnard College


Yvette Christiansë is a South African-born poet, novelist, and scholar. She is the author of two books of poetry:Imprendehora (published in South Africa by Kwela Books/Snail Press 2009) and Castaway (Duke University Press, 1999). Imprendehora was a finalist for the Via Afrika Herman Charles Bosman Prize in 2010 and Castaway was a finalist in the 2001 PEN International Poetry Prize. Her novel Unconfessed (Other Press, 2006; Kwela Books, 2007; Querido, 2007) was a finalist for the Hemingway/PEN Prize for first fiction and received a 2007 ForeWord Magazine BEA Award. It was also shortlisted for the University of Johannesburg Prize and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award in 2008, and nominated for the Ama Ata Aidoo Prize 2010. Her poetry has been published in the U.S., South Africa, Australia, Canada, France and Italy. She is also the recipient of The Harri Jones Memorial Prize for poetry (Australia).
She teaches poetry and prose of former English colonies (with an emphasis on South Africa, the Caribbean and Australia), narratives of African Diaspora, 20th Century African American Literatures, poetics and creative writing. Her research interests include the nexus between theories of race and gender, class and postcoloniality. She has been a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at Duke University’s John Hope Franklin Center and a Visiting Professor at Princeton University’s Center for Creative and Performing Arts. She has also been a National Research Council Fellow at the University of Witwatersrand and a visiting writer at the University of Cape Town. Her manuscript on Toni Morrison’s poetics and is forthcoming from Fordham University Press. She is currently writing a book on representations of Liberated Africans or Recaptives between 1807 and 1886.Poet and fiction writer, Yvette Christiansë, was born in South Africa under apartheid and immigrated with her parents to Australia at age 18. Her work has been published internationally, and her poetry collection, Castaway, was a finalist for the 2001 PEN International Poetry Prize. Her acclaimed first novel, Unconfessed, is based on the life of a slave woman in the Cape Colony and was a finalist for the 2007 Hemingway/PEN International Prize for First Fiction.
Academic Focus:
Poetry (with an emphasis on South Africa, the Caribbean and Australia)


Education:
Ph.D., B.A., University of Sydney

Related Web Sites:
Personal Website
Christiansë Page on RedRoom
South Africa – Poetry International Web
Africana Studies


Location:
Columbia University
758 Schermerhorn Ext.

Source: Institute for Research in African American Studies, Columbia University

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10/20/17 Conversations – “Genealogies of Race and Religion in Colonial Senegal”

Convos2017-10-20
“Genealogies of Race and Religion in Colonial Senegal”
Speaker: Wendell Hassan Marsh, PhD Candidate
Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies-Columbia University
+++Free and Open to the Public++

Abstract:
Many scholars have noted the importance of a racialized understanding of religion in the French colonial project in the areas in and around contemporary Senegal.

Islam noir — the concept that distinguished African Muslims from so-called white Muslims of the Arab heartlands, by virtue of a personal and charismatic model of devotion institutionalized in Sufi orders, a syncretic and non-textual orientation to religious practice, and an easily governable docility — is now said to be a relic of a racist colonial past that must be got beyond. In this talk, I propose that some of the ways that contemporary scholars have tried to go beyond race fail to appreciate the work that different ideas of race did in negotiations between colonial administrators and Muslim notables.
The theory of a racialized Islam was used in the production of durable structures during the colonial period that have shaped the way Islam has been understood, lived, and governed. Instead of either discarding race or enshrining it as a transhistorical human category, I examine the Franco-Senegalese racial project and its development of Islamic structures during the colonial moment by reading a genealogy of the saintly figure al-Hajj Umar Tal by Shaykh Musa Kamara. Taken from The Most Deicious of Sciences and the Best of the News in the Life of Hajj Umar, this excerpt of a 1935 text offers a critical view of what was emerging as the joint racial project of the colony-state and indigenous elites as well as the powerful structures of the Sufi brotherhoods in a process of mutual accommodation.

Source

IRAAS Graduate Student Presentations 2016

IRAAS Graduate Student Presentations
Wednesday, May 11, 2016

6:00pm-8:00pm; Rm 754 Schermerhorn Extension

Free and Open to the Public

Presentations

“From Whiteness to Witness: Morality and the Reader in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye and God Help the Child”
Esther G.K. Dummett, MA Candidate African-American Studies 
“South Sudanese Beauty Queens: Nation-Building, Identity  and
Notions of Supremacy”

Brittaney N. Graham, MA Candidate African-American Studies
“Come In My Room, Come On In The Prayer Room”: Sister Gertrude Morgan’s Subversive Salvation”

Imani Uzuri, MA Candidate African-American Studies 


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