4/13/18 IRAAS Conversation Lecture Series Ericka Huggins

“We Are The Ones We Are Waiting For”

With
Ericka Huggins
Human Rights Activist, Poet, Educator,
Black Panther Party Leader and Former Political prisoner
Bio compiled from ErickaHuggins.com
I am a human rights activist, poet, educator, Black Panther Party leader and former political prisoner. For the past 36 years I’ve lectured throughout the United States and internationally. My life experiences have enabled me to speak personally and honestly on issues relating to the physical and emotional well-being of women, children and youth, whole being education, the incarceration of men and women of color, and the role of the spiritual practice in sustaining activism and promoting social change.
As a result of my 14-year tenure as a leading member of the Black Panther Party I bring a unique perspective to the challenges and successes of the Black Panther Party and, its significance today. My desire to serve humanity began in 1963, when I attended the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. There, I committed to serving people for the rest of my life. In 1968, at age 18, I joined the Black Panther Party. I soon became a leader in the Los Angeles chapter of the Black Panther Party with my husband John Huggins.
From 1973–1981, I was the Director of the Oakland Community School, the groundbreaking community-run child development center and elementary school founded by the Black Panther Party. Working with a team of incredibly talented party members and local educators a vision for the innovative curriculum for the school was written. This curriculum and the principles that inspired it became a model for and predecessor to the charter school movement.
During that time, with community support, I became both the first woman and the first Black person to be appointed to the Alameda County Board of Education, which serves children with cognitive, emotional and physical disabilities and, incarcerated youth in the county’s many school districts.
Ten years after my release from prison, in 1981, I returned to California state, county, and federal prisons and jails to share my experiences of yoga and meditation. A focus of my volunteer efforts has been with incarcerated youth. I have continued this work with adults and, in addition, I have continues this work in homes for foster and adopted children and teens. For the past 20 years, I’ve also taught relaxation and mindfulness in California youth correctional facilities, in addition to many California public school districts and community colleges.
In 1990, at the height of public awareness of HIV/AIDS, I was the first woman practical support volunteer coordinator at the world-renowned Shanti Project. I also developed a unique volunteer support program for women and children of color, living with HIV, in the Tenderloin and Mission districts of San Francisco.
During my time at Shanti Project and later Aids Project of Contra Costa County, I helped develop citywide programs for the support of gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgender and questioning youth and adults with HIV/AIDS.
From 2003-2011 I was a professor of Women and Gender Studies at San Francisco State University and California State University, East Bay. From 2008-2015 I was professor of Sociology and African American Studies in the Peralta Community College District.
Currently, I am one of the facilitators with World Trust. World Trust uses films that document, through story, the impact of systems of racial inequity. These films are tools to foster conversation about race, and all structural inequities. These conversations are powerful to personal and global transformation. Below are the films that I use to stimulate dialogue as I travel and speak to audiences large and small:
The Way Home: Women Talk About Race in America
Light in the Shadows: Staying at the Table When the Conversation About Race Gets Hard
Mirrors of Privilege: Making Whiteness Visible
Cracking the Codes: A System of Racial Inequity
And coming soon in September 2017: Healing Justice: Cultivating a World of Belonging
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT HTTPS://WWW.ERICKAHUGGINS.COM/

Source: http://iraas.columbia.edu/Event/we-are-ones-we-are-waiting

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3/23/18 IRAAS Conversation Lecture “Letters from Langston: from the Harlem Renaissance to the Red Scare and Beyond”

FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2018 4:00PM
IRAAS Conversation Lecture
“Letters from Langston: from the Harlem Renaissance to the Red Scare and Beyond”
with
Evelyn L. Crawford & Mary L. Patterson
Room 754 Schermerhorn Extension
Free & Open to The Public
Descriptor
Langston Hughes, one of America’s greatest writers, was an innovator of jazz poetry and a leader of the Harlem Renaissance whose poems and plays resonate widely today. Accessible, personal, and inspirational, Hughes’s poems portray the African American community in struggle in the context of a turbulent modern United States and a rising black freedom movement. This indispensable volume of letters between Hughes and four leftist confidants sheds vivid light on his life and politics. Letters from Langston begins in 1930 and ends shortly before his death in 1967, providing a window into a unique, self-created world where Hughes lived at ease. This distinctive volume collects the stories of Hughes and his friends in an era of uncertainty and reveals their visions of an idealized world—one without hunger, war, racism, and class oppression.
Speakers Bios
Evelyn Louise Crawford, a retired arts administrator and consultant, and MaryLouise Patterson, a pediatrician in clinical practice, are the daughters of Langston Hughes’s cherished friends Evelyn Graves Crawford, Matt N. Crawford, Louise Thompson Patterson, and William L. Patterson. Hughes was a frequent guest in the homes of the two families and was like an uncle to to Evelyn Louise and MaryLouise.

http://iraas.columbia.edu/Event/letters-langston-harlem-renaissance-red-scare-and-beyond

2/2/18 IRAAS Conversasations: Anna Lucia Araujo, PhD

DATE & TIME:
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 02, 2018

4:00PM TO 6:00PM

“Reparations for Slavery and the Slave Trade: A Transnational & Comparative History”

Anna Lucia Araujo, Professor of History-Howard University

Location: Women, Gender & Sexuality Seminar room

754 Schermerhorn, Extension. Columbia University

**Books will be available for purchase via Book Culture Bookstore onsite**

Speaker Bio

Ana Lucia Araujo is a social and cultural historian. Her work explores the history and the memory of the Atlantic slave trade and slavery and their social and cultural legacies. In the last fifteen years, she authored and edited over ten books and published nearly fifty articles and chapters on these themes. Her single-authored books include Brazil Through French Eyes: A Nineteenth-Century Artist in the Tropics (2015), recently published in Portuguese by the press of the University of São Paulo, Shadows of the Slave Past: Memory, Heritage and Slavery (2014), and Public Memory of Slavery: Victims and Perpetrators in the South Atlantic (2010). Her most recent book is Reparations for Slavery and the Slave Trade: A Transnational and Comparative History (2017). Currently, Ana Lucia Araujo is a full professor in the Department of History in the historically black Howard University in Washington DC. She is also member of the International Scientific Committee of the UNESCO’s Slave Route Project.

Please visit her website: http://www.analuciaaraujo.org/

12/1/17 IRAAS Conversations with Abosede George, PhD

imageCONVERSATIONS WITH ABOSEDE GEORGE

DATE & TIME: FRIDAY, DECEMBER 01, 2017
4:00PM TO 6:00PM
TOPIC: TBA

Abosede George joined the faculty of Barnard College and Columbia University in 2007. She received her PhD in History in 2006 from Stanford University. Her research and teaching interests have been focused on urban history of Africa, the history of childhood and youth in Africa, and the study of women, gender, and sexuality in African History. Her articles have appeared in the Journal of Social History, Women’s Studies Quarterly, and the Scholar and Feminist Online. Her new book, Making Modern Girls: A History of Girlhood, Labor, and Social Development was published in 2014 by Ohio University Press in their New African Histories series.
Increasingly her research interests have turned to the 19th century in Lagos, to issues of gender, ethnicity, migration, and the records of reverse diaspora communities from the Americas, the Caribbean, and other regions of West Africa. She is currently at work on The Ekopolitan Project, a digital archive of family history sources on migrant communities in nineteenth- and twentieth century Lagos, West Africa. Visit: http://www.ekopolitanproject.org

She maintains faculty affiliations with the Africana Studies Program at Barnard, the Institute for African Studies at Columbia (IAS), the Barnard Center for Research on Women (BCRW), and the Center for the Critical Analysis of Social Difference (CCASD). She received her B.A. from Rutgers University (1999) and her Ph.D. from Stanford (2006).

Selected Publications
Making Modern Girls: A history of girlhood, labor, and social development in 20th century colonial Lagos (Ohio University Press, New African Histories series, 2014) Winner of 2015 Aidoo-Snyder Book Prize from the African Studies Association Women’s Caucus http://www.ohioswallow.com/book/Making+Modern+Girls

“Getting the Hang of It,” Scholar and Feminist Online: Gender, Justice, and Neoliberal Transformations, Fall 2013 http://sfonline.barnard.edu/gender-justice-and-neoliberal-transformation…
“Within Salvation: Girl Hawkers and the Colonial State in Development Era Lagos,” Journal of Social History, Spring 2011
“Feminist Activism and Class Politics: The Example of the Lagos Girl Hawker Project,” Women’s Studies Quarterly 35 (2007)

Source: http://iraas.columbia.edu/Event/conversations-abosede-george

 

Location:
Columbia University
758 Schermerhorn Ext.

11/17/17 Conversations Yvette Christianse, PhD – Reading The Register of Liberated Africans in the Seychelles

CONVERSATIONS WITH YVETTE CHRISTIANSE

DATE & TIME:
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2017

4:00PM TO 6:00PM

TOPIC: READING THE REGISTER OF LIBERATED AFRICANS IN THE SEYCHELLES
YVETTE CHRISTIANSË
Chair, Africana Studies Department; Professor, Africana Studies & English and Comparative Literature, Barnard College


Yvette Christiansë is a South African-born poet, novelist, and scholar. She is the author of two books of poetry:Imprendehora (published in South Africa by Kwela Books/Snail Press 2009) and Castaway (Duke University Press, 1999). Imprendehora was a finalist for the Via Afrika Herman Charles Bosman Prize in 2010 and Castaway was a finalist in the 2001 PEN International Poetry Prize. Her novel Unconfessed (Other Press, 2006; Kwela Books, 2007; Querido, 2007) was a finalist for the Hemingway/PEN Prize for first fiction and received a 2007 ForeWord Magazine BEA Award. It was also shortlisted for the University of Johannesburg Prize and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award in 2008, and nominated for the Ama Ata Aidoo Prize 2010. Her poetry has been published in the U.S., South Africa, Australia, Canada, France and Italy. She is also the recipient of The Harri Jones Memorial Prize for poetry (Australia).
She teaches poetry and prose of former English colonies (with an emphasis on South Africa, the Caribbean and Australia), narratives of African Diaspora, 20th Century African American Literatures, poetics and creative writing. Her research interests include the nexus between theories of race and gender, class and postcoloniality. She has been a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at Duke University’s John Hope Franklin Center and a Visiting Professor at Princeton University’s Center for Creative and Performing Arts. She has also been a National Research Council Fellow at the University of Witwatersrand and a visiting writer at the University of Cape Town. Her manuscript on Toni Morrison’s poetics and is forthcoming from Fordham University Press. She is currently writing a book on representations of Liberated Africans or Recaptives between 1807 and 1886.Poet and fiction writer, Yvette Christiansë, was born in South Africa under apartheid and immigrated with her parents to Australia at age 18. Her work has been published internationally, and her poetry collection, Castaway, was a finalist for the 2001 PEN International Poetry Prize. Her acclaimed first novel, Unconfessed, is based on the life of a slave woman in the Cape Colony and was a finalist for the 2007 Hemingway/PEN International Prize for First Fiction.
Academic Focus:
Poetry (with an emphasis on South Africa, the Caribbean and Australia)


Education:
Ph.D., B.A., University of Sydney

Related Web Sites:
Personal Website
Christiansë Page on RedRoom
South Africa – Poetry International Web
Africana Studies


Location:
Columbia University
758 Schermerhorn Ext.

Source: Institute for Research in African American Studies, Columbia University

10/20/17 Conversations – “Genealogies of Race and Religion in Colonial Senegal”

Convos2017-10-20
“Genealogies of Race and Religion in Colonial Senegal”
Speaker: Wendell Hassan Marsh, PhD Candidate
Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies-Columbia University
+++Free and Open to the Public++

Abstract:
Many scholars have noted the importance of a racialized understanding of religion in the French colonial project in the areas in and around contemporary Senegal.

Islam noir — the concept that distinguished African Muslims from so-called white Muslims of the Arab heartlands, by virtue of a personal and charismatic model of devotion institutionalized in Sufi orders, a syncretic and non-textual orientation to religious practice, and an easily governable docility — is now said to be a relic of a racist colonial past that must be got beyond. In this talk, I propose that some of the ways that contemporary scholars have tried to go beyond race fail to appreciate the work that different ideas of race did in negotiations between colonial administrators and Muslim notables.
The theory of a racialized Islam was used in the production of durable structures during the colonial period that have shaped the way Islam has been understood, lived, and governed. Instead of either discarding race or enshrining it as a transhistorical human category, I examine the Franco-Senegalese racial project and its development of Islamic structures during the colonial moment by reading a genealogy of the saintly figure al-Hajj Umar Tal by Shaykh Musa Kamara. Taken from The Most Deicious of Sciences and the Best of the News in the Life of Hajj Umar, this excerpt of a 1935 text offers a critical view of what was emerging as the joint racial project of the colony-state and indigenous elites as well as the powerful structures of the Sufi brotherhoods in a process of mutual accommodation.

Source

IRAAS Graduate Student Presentations 2016

IRAAS Graduate Student Presentations
Wednesday, May 11, 2016

6:00pm-8:00pm; Rm 754 Schermerhorn Extension

Free and Open to the Public

Presentations

“From Whiteness to Witness: Morality and the Reader in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye and God Help the Child”
Esther G.K. Dummett, MA Candidate African-American Studies 
“South Sudanese Beauty Queens: Nation-Building, Identity  and
Notions of Supremacy”

Brittaney N. Graham, MA Candidate African-American Studies
“Come In My Room, Come On In The Prayer Room”: Sister Gertrude Morgan’s Subversive Salvation”

Imani Uzuri, MA Candidate African-American Studies 


On Campus Map