Thank You for supporting our Toy Drive

IMG_0507Saturday December 2, 2017 at Solomon & Kuff Rum Hall in Harlem, NY, unwrapped toys, educational items, posters, blankets, diverse dolls and gifts were collected to support children and young adults up to 22 years old.

Executives in attendance hailed from Amazon Black Employee Network, Sirius XM Black Employee Network, HSBC Bank, State University of New York (SUNY) Suffolk County Community College, City University of New York (CUNY) Brooklyn College, New York City Department of Youth and Community Services, New York City Parks Department, Rustic Tavern, NFL Network, Goldman Sachs, General Electric, Citizens Financial Group, JP Morgan Chase, and many more organizations.

Tyler James, Director of Workforce Development at New York City Administration of Children Services coordinated the successful toy drive to support over 100 youth. Attendees shared “It is such an honor to support our youth and build new community ties at the same time.”

Columbia University graduates attended from Columbia Business School, Columbia College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and Mailman School of Public Health.

The second annual event was held in conjunction with the 111th anniversary of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. founded December 4, 1906 at Cornell University. Representatives from the states of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Rhode Island were eager to support this worthwhile initiative.

The collaboration was hosted by

 

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12/1/17 IRAAS Conversations with Abosede George, PhD

imageCONVERSATIONS WITH ABOSEDE GEORGE

DATE & TIME: FRIDAY, DECEMBER 01, 2017
4:00PM TO 6:00PM
TOPIC: TBA

Abosede George joined the faculty of Barnard College and Columbia University in 2007. She received her PhD in History in 2006 from Stanford University. Her research and teaching interests have been focused on urban history of Africa, the history of childhood and youth in Africa, and the study of women, gender, and sexuality in African History. Her articles have appeared in the Journal of Social History, Women’s Studies Quarterly, and the Scholar and Feminist Online. Her new book, Making Modern Girls: A History of Girlhood, Labor, and Social Development was published in 2014 by Ohio University Press in their New African Histories series.
Increasingly her research interests have turned to the 19th century in Lagos, to issues of gender, ethnicity, migration, and the records of reverse diaspora communities from the Americas, the Caribbean, and other regions of West Africa. She is currently at work on The Ekopolitan Project, a digital archive of family history sources on migrant communities in nineteenth- and twentieth century Lagos, West Africa. Visit: http://www.ekopolitanproject.org

She maintains faculty affiliations with the Africana Studies Program at Barnard, the Institute for African Studies at Columbia (IAS), the Barnard Center for Research on Women (BCRW), and the Center for the Critical Analysis of Social Difference (CCASD). She received her B.A. from Rutgers University (1999) and her Ph.D. from Stanford (2006).

Selected Publications
Making Modern Girls: A history of girlhood, labor, and social development in 20th century colonial Lagos (Ohio University Press, New African Histories series, 2014) Winner of 2015 Aidoo-Snyder Book Prize from the African Studies Association Women’s Caucus http://www.ohioswallow.com/book/Making+Modern+Girls

“Getting the Hang of It,” Scholar and Feminist Online: Gender, Justice, and Neoliberal Transformations, Fall 2013 http://sfonline.barnard.edu/gender-justice-and-neoliberal-transformation…
“Within Salvation: Girl Hawkers and the Colonial State in Development Era Lagos,” Journal of Social History, Spring 2011
“Feminist Activism and Class Politics: The Example of the Lagos Girl Hawker Project,” Women’s Studies Quarterly 35 (2007)

Source: http://iraas.columbia.edu/Event/conversations-abosede-george

 

Location:
Columbia University
758 Schermerhorn Ext.

11/17/17 Conversations Yvette Christianse, PhD – Reading The Register of Liberated Africans in the Seychelles

CONVERSATIONS WITH YVETTE CHRISTIANSE

DATE & TIME:
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2017

4:00PM TO 6:00PM

TOPIC: READING THE REGISTER OF LIBERATED AFRICANS IN THE SEYCHELLES
YVETTE CHRISTIANSË
Chair, Africana Studies Department; Professor, Africana Studies & English and Comparative Literature, Barnard College


Yvette Christiansë is a South African-born poet, novelist, and scholar. She is the author of two books of poetry:Imprendehora (published in South Africa by Kwela Books/Snail Press 2009) and Castaway (Duke University Press, 1999). Imprendehora was a finalist for the Via Afrika Herman Charles Bosman Prize in 2010 and Castaway was a finalist in the 2001 PEN International Poetry Prize. Her novel Unconfessed (Other Press, 2006; Kwela Books, 2007; Querido, 2007) was a finalist for the Hemingway/PEN Prize for first fiction and received a 2007 ForeWord Magazine BEA Award. It was also shortlisted for the University of Johannesburg Prize and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award in 2008, and nominated for the Ama Ata Aidoo Prize 2010. Her poetry has been published in the U.S., South Africa, Australia, Canada, France and Italy. She is also the recipient of The Harri Jones Memorial Prize for poetry (Australia).
She teaches poetry and prose of former English colonies (with an emphasis on South Africa, the Caribbean and Australia), narratives of African Diaspora, 20th Century African American Literatures, poetics and creative writing. Her research interests include the nexus between theories of race and gender, class and postcoloniality. She has been a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at Duke University’s John Hope Franklin Center and a Visiting Professor at Princeton University’s Center for Creative and Performing Arts. She has also been a National Research Council Fellow at the University of Witwatersrand and a visiting writer at the University of Cape Town. Her manuscript on Toni Morrison’s poetics and is forthcoming from Fordham University Press. She is currently writing a book on representations of Liberated Africans or Recaptives between 1807 and 1886.Poet and fiction writer, Yvette Christiansë, was born in South Africa under apartheid and immigrated with her parents to Australia at age 18. Her work has been published internationally, and her poetry collection, Castaway, was a finalist for the 2001 PEN International Poetry Prize. Her acclaimed first novel, Unconfessed, is based on the life of a slave woman in the Cape Colony and was a finalist for the 2007 Hemingway/PEN International Prize for First Fiction.
Academic Focus:
Poetry (with an emphasis on South Africa, the Caribbean and Australia)


Education:
Ph.D., B.A., University of Sydney

Related Web Sites:
Personal Website
Christiansë Page on RedRoom
South Africa – Poetry International Web
Africana Studies


Location:
Columbia University
758 Schermerhorn Ext.

Source: Institute for Research in African American Studies, Columbia University

10/20/17 Conversations – “Genealogies of Race and Religion in Colonial Senegal”

Convos2017-10-20
“Genealogies of Race and Religion in Colonial Senegal”
Speaker: Wendell Hassan Marsh, PhD Candidate
Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies-Columbia University
+++Free and Open to the Public++

Abstract:
Many scholars have noted the importance of a racialized understanding of religion in the French colonial project in the areas in and around contemporary Senegal.

Islam noir — the concept that distinguished African Muslims from so-called white Muslims of the Arab heartlands, by virtue of a personal and charismatic model of devotion institutionalized in Sufi orders, a syncretic and non-textual orientation to religious practice, and an easily governable docility — is now said to be a relic of a racist colonial past that must be got beyond. In this talk, I propose that some of the ways that contemporary scholars have tried to go beyond race fail to appreciate the work that different ideas of race did in negotiations between colonial administrators and Muslim notables.
The theory of a racialized Islam was used in the production of durable structures during the colonial period that have shaped the way Islam has been understood, lived, and governed. Instead of either discarding race or enshrining it as a transhistorical human category, I examine the Franco-Senegalese racial project and its development of Islamic structures during the colonial moment by reading a genealogy of the saintly figure al-Hajj Umar Tal by Shaykh Musa Kamara. Taken from The Most Deicious of Sciences and the Best of the News in the Life of Hajj Umar, this excerpt of a 1935 text offers a critical view of what was emerging as the joint racial project of the colony-state and indigenous elites as well as the powerful structures of the Sufi brotherhoods in a process of mutual accommodation.

Source

A Celebration of 50 Years of Art in NYC Parks with Dr. Allison Janae Hamilton ’10, ’17

Allison Janae Hamilton
Foresta (detail, installation view), 2017
Mixed media installation with birch logs, wrought iron fence posts, taxidermy forms, horse manes, tambourines, clothing and regalia
Courtesy the artist
Photo: Adam Reich

10-21-17 11:00am—3:00pm

East Pinetum – Central Park

Adult Programs, Fictions

Create a collaborative installation with Fictions artist Allison Janae Hamilton as we help celebrate 50 Years of Public Art in NYC Parks! On Saturday, October 21, the Studio Museum will join 50+ artists and arts organizations in transforming Central Park’s East Pinetum field into an open platform for public art inspired by the NYC Parks Department’s landmark program. Tapping into Hamilton’s practice of creating immersive spaces using plant matter, layered imagery and sounds, visitors are invited to explore the Park’s social history and participate in the creation of an art work in honor of Seneca Village.

 

Source: Studio Museum of Harlem

Please Join Us for a Panel about our Past, Present, & Future – July 12 at 6:30 pm

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Please join us for a panel to consider what has changed in the past century, to think about the c...

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MEET OUR PANELISTS

Dante Barry – Currently at the helm of the country’s leading Black and Brown led national racial justice network to end mass criminalization and gun violence, Million Hoodies Movement for Justice.

Afua Atta-Mensah – Executive Director of Community Voices Heard (CVH) a member-led multi-racial organization, principally women of color and low-income families in New York State that builds power to secure social, economic and racial justice for all.

Crystal Feimster – An associate professor in the Department of African American Studies, the American Studies Program and History Department at Yale University. Her manuscript, Southern Horrors: Women and the Politics of Rape and Lynching, examines the roles of both black and white women in the politics of racial and sexual violence in the American South.

Rujeko Hockley – Co-organizer of We Wanted A Revolution: Black Radical Women 1965–85, currently on view at The Brooklyn Museum. Hockley is the former Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art at Brooklyn Museum and now Assistant Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

 

The panel will be moderated by Samuel K. Roberts, STSI Director; Associate Professor of History (Columbia Univ. Sch. of Arts & Sciences); Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences (Columbia Univ. Mailman School of Public Health).

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This panel is part of Columbia University’s Institute for Research in African-American Studies (IRAAS) 2017 Summer Teachers and Scholars Institute (STSI). This portion of the STSI is free and open to the public. To  learn more about the STIS please visit columbiastsi.com or email stsi@columbia.edu .
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Columbia Law School Paul Robeson Conference February 24, 2017

robesonconf2017

The Columbia Law School Black Law Students Association (BLSA) and Columbia Journal of Race and Law (CJRL) are proud to host the 23rd Annual Paul Robeson ’23 Conference, which will be held on Friday, February 24, 2017 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM at Columbia Law School, located at 435 W. 116th St. New York, NY 10027.

Our theme for the 2017 Paul Robeson Conference is Reclaiming the Narrative. In our current legal, political, and social climate, people of color still struggle to dictate their narrative. We aim to highlight the work of legal practitioners, policymakers, social entrepreneurs, and activists to pursue racial justice, uproot structural inequalities, and disrupt stereotypes about people of color.

Please RSVP to this free and exciting event at http://paulrobesonconference2017.eventbrite.com.

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Angela T. Rye, Esq. will give the keynote address during lunchtime. Rye is the Principal and CEO of IMPACT Strategies, a CNN commentator and NPR political analyst, and former Executive Director and General Counsel for the Congressional Black Caucus.

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Khalil Cumberbatch will give the opening keynote address. Cumberbatch is a lecturer at Columbia University’s School of Social Work, Manager of Trainings for JustLeadershipUSA, and a formerly incarcerated advocate for social justice movements.

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The Conference will also feature three panels throughout the day, including:

A Path Forward for Democracy and Voting Rights After 2016, featuring:

  • Myrna Pérez ’03, Deputy Director, Democracy Program, Brennan Center for Justice
  • Stuart Naifeh ’04, Senior Counsel, Demos 
  • Joanna Cuevas Ingram, Associate Counsel, LatinoJustice PRLDEF

Building Wealth and Seeking Economic Justice, featuring:

  • Coss Marte, CEO/Founder, Coss Athletics
  • Jennifer Jones Austin, Esq., CEO and Executive Director, Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies
  • Ifeoma Ike, Esq., Deputy Executive Director, NYC Young Men’s Initiative, Office of Mayor Bill deBlasio
  • JoAnne Page, President and CEO, The Fortune Society
  • Khary Lazarre, Executive Director and Co-Founder, The Brotherhood/Sister Sol

Revolutionary Art, Activism, and the Law, featuring:

  • Soffiyah Elijah, Executive Director, Alliance of Families for Justice 
  • Ronald Hampton, Immediate Past Executive Director, National Black Police Association 
  • Britton Smith, Actor and Director, Broadway for Black Lives Matter

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Breakfast and lunch will be served, and a reception will follow the Conference.

Please RSVP to this free and exciting event at http://paulrobesonconference2017.eventbrite.com.

Full schedule is available here. Feel free to attend as much or as little as you can.

Questions? Please contact Shane Grannum ’18 at sag2230@columbia.edu.

Shane Grannum

J.D. Candidate | Columbia Law School ’18

A.B. Public Policy; Latin American/Caribbean Studies | Brown University ’15

sag2230@columbia.edu

2/23 – 2/25/17 Pratt Institute – Unity & Struggle Workshop with Tongo Eisen Martin

prattblm-2017-2

Hosted as a part of Pratt Institute’s BlackLivesMatter Teach-In:

Led by Tongo Eisen Martin, the Unity and Struggle workshop will cover realities of late stage imperialism and organizing against it. We will especially focus on consciousness; how do people accept the illusion of a permanent empire or oppressor, what does that counterrevolutionary acceptance look like, and conversely, what is revolutionary consciousness (at least in practice). We will begin to answer for ourselves how do we relate to each other now, and how do we need to relate to each other to win liberation.

RSVP here: https://goo.gl/forms/sPfx8VEx8xbhBIBV2

For a full list of workshops and events visit www.blacklivesmatterpratt.com

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